Free Patterns · Holiday and Occasion · Kids

Fairy Tooth Pillow

The final tooth in my tooth fairy pillow collection is here. If you missed it, I have a dinomonster and a superhero that are adorable. And if you are looking for something with no frills, but still super cute, check out my small tooth pillow here. Finally, it’s worth mentioning, if you love the simple look of my small design, but wish it was bigger, you can use the pattern for the tooth panels found in this post and leave off all the extra features!

Maybe because I live in a house full of boys, but I absolutely enjoy any opportunity to make super feminine and pretty things. I just love the added texture from the tulle and the pop of color from those sweet flowers.

After crocheting the tooth panels, simply work up a bunch of flowers and attach the tulle. It’s so easy to turn your tooth into a beautiful fairy! I think you could also omit the tulle and make a horn for a unicorn version that would be darling. If only there were more hours in the day, I would have done that one too! Let me know if any of you try it, I would absolutely love to see it.

Fairy Tooth Pillow

Supplies:

  • Worsted weight yarn – I used Loops & Threads Impeccable in putty
  • Small amounts of scrap yarn in a variety of colors for the flowers
  • 3.75 mm crochet hook
  • Scissors
  • Needle for sewing down yarn tails
  • Embroidery floss
  • Needle for embroidery details
  • 9 mm safety eyes or 12 mm animal eyes (I used 9 mm safety eyes)
  • Poly-fil or stuffing of choice
  • Small piece of felt (optional)
  • Small piece of ribbon for hanging (optional)

Note about supplies:  Please be mindful of safety and durability when selecting embellishments, especially if you intend to give this to a small child.  For example, something like safety eyes or animal eyes could be a choking hazard and you may want to embroider eyes instead.  If you don’t have felt, you could crochet a small rectangle for the pocket; I would do this in single crochet to make a tight fabric.  

Finished DimensionsFinished piece is approximately 7.5 inches tall 

Abbreviations and stiches used:

  • CH          chain
  • SC           single crochet
  • INC         increase (i.e. work 2 SC in the same stitch)
  • DEC        decrease (i.e. work one SC over two stitches, see pattern notes if unsure)
  • SS            slip stitch

Pattern Notes:

The beginning CH 1 at the start of rows does not count as a stitch throughout unless otherwise specified.

To work a DEC, insert hook into next stitch, yarn over and pull up one loop (2 loops on hook).  Insert hook into the next stitch, yarn over and pull up one loop (3 loops on hook).  Yarn over and pull through all loops on hook.  You have created one SC stitch worked over two stitches, decreasing your stitch count by one.

When embroidering details, I find it works best to use a sharp needle and to try to make stitches that penetrate through the fibers of the yarn, not in the gaps between crochet stitches.  While you need to pull your working thread taught, don’t pull it too tightly.

This piece is worked by crocheting a front and back panel.  Each panel is worked from bottom to top.  Then, the two panels are crocheted together and the piece is stuffed. 

Pattern:

Bottom Leg #1

  • Row 1:  CH 3, SC in second CH from hook and in last CH (2 SC)
  • Row 2:  CH 1, turn.  INC in each stitch (4 SC)
  • Row 3:  CH 1, turn.  SC, SC, INC, INC (6 SC)
  • Row 4:  CH 1, turn.  SC in each stitch (6 SC)
  • Row 5:  CH 1, turn.  INC, SC in remaining stitches (7 SC)
  • Row 6:  CH 1, turn.  SC in each stitch (7 SC)
  • Row 7-8:  CH 1, turn.  Repeat Row 6
  • Row 9:  CH 1, turn.  INC, SC in each stitch (8 SC)
  • Row 10:  CH 1, turn.  SC in each stitch (8 SC)
  • Row 11:  Repeat Row 10
  • Row 12:  CH 1, turn.  INC, SC in each stitch (9 SC)
  • Row 13:  CH 1, turn.  SC in each stitch (9 SC)
  • Row 14:  Repeat Row 13
  • Row 15:  CH 1, turn.  INC, SC in each stitch (10 SC)
  • Row 16:  CH 1, turn.  SC in each stitch (10 SC)
  • Row 17:  Repeat Row 16
  • Row 18:  CH 1, turn.  INC, SC in each stitch (11 SC)
  • Row 19:  CH 1, turn.  SC in each stitch (11 SC)

Break yarn and set aside for now.

Bottom Leg #2

  • Row 1:  CH 3, SC in second CH from hook and in last CH (2 SC)
  • Row 2:  CH 1, turn.  INC in each stitch (4 SC)
  • Row 3:  CH 1, turn.  INC, INC, SC, SC (6 SC)
  • Row 4:  CH 1, turn.  SC in each stitch (6 SC)
  • Row 5:  CH 1, turn.  SC in first five stitches, INC in last (7 SC)
  • Row 6:  CH 1, turn.  SC in each stitch (7 SC)
  • Row 7-8:  CH 1, turn.  Repeat Row 6
  • Row 9:  CH 1, turn.  SC in first six stitches, INC in last (8 SC)
  • Row 10:  CH 1, turn.  SC in each stitch (8 SC)
  • Row 11:  Repeat Row 10
  • Row 12:  CH 1, turn.  SC in first seven stitches, INC in last (9 SC)
  • Row 13:  CH 1, turn.  SC in each stitch (9 SC)
  • Row 14:  Repeat Row 13
  • Row 15:  CH 1, turn.  SC in first 8 stitches, INC in last (10 SC)
  • Row 16:  CH 1, turn.  SC in each stitch (10 SC)
  • Row 17:  Repeat Row 16
  • Row 18:  CH 1, turn.  SC in first nine stitches, INC in last (11 SC)
  • Row 19:  CH 1, turn.  SC in each stitch (11 SC)

DO NOT fasten off!

From here you will crochet rows that span across both legs.  Each leg has a final stitch count of 11 and you will CH 1 between the legs (which will count as a stitch) bringing your new stitch count to 23 SC.  Be mindful of yarn tales, you want the yarn tale at the end of Row 19 for bottom leg #1 to be to the right so your stitches face the same way throughout.

Image 1: depicts yarn tail to the right. Images 2-3: show crocheting Row 20 across bottom leg #2, CH 1. Image 4: illustrates continuing to crochet Row 20 across bottom leg #1.

Continuing from bottom leg #2

  • Row 20:  CH 1, turn.  SC across, CH 1, and continue to SC across bottom leg #1 (11 SC, CH 1, 11 SC)
  • Row 21:  CH 1, turn.  SC across (including into the CH 1 between legs) (23 SC)
  • Row 22:  CH 1, turn.  SC across (23 SC)
  • Row 23-35:  Repeat Row 22

From here you will work the top bump of the tooth which will be done working on one half of the panel, leaving the other half unworked.  Then you will attach your yarn and work the second top bump in the remaining half of stitches.

Image 1: panel worked through Row 35. Image 2: first top bump made. Images 3-4: return to Row 35, SKIP one stitch, draw up a loop and CH 1.

First Top Bump

  • Row 36:  CH 1, turn.  SC in next nine stitches, DEC (10 SC)
  • Row 37:  CH 1, turn, SKIP first stitch, SC in next nine stitches (9 SC)
  • Row 38:  CH 1, turn, SKIP first stitch, SC in next six, DEC (7 SC)

Break yarn.

Second Top Bump

Return to Row 35 to work the unworked stitches from Row 36

SKIP one stitch, insert hook into the next stitch, draw up a loop, and CH 1 

  • Row 36:  SKIP the first stitch and SC in last ten stitches (10 SC)
  • Row 37: CH 1, turn.  SC in next eight stitches, DEC (9 SC)
  • Row 38:  CH 1, turn.  SKIP the first stitch, SC in next six, DEC (7 SC)

Break yarn and set aside for now.

Repeat the instructions to create a second panel.

Stitch Panels Together:            

Line up the panels.  You will notice along the edges a series of bumps and loops – a loop is the side of a stitch at the end of a row and a bump is the backside of the CH at the start of a row.  I like to crochet into these bumps and loops because it ensures I do only one stitch per row and this method doesn’t leave noticeable gaps.  However, you are free to work stitches along the edges using whatever method works for you, just try to place your stitches evenly apart. 

Image 1: illustrates the loops “( )” and bumps “I” along the edge. Images 2-3: show working a SC decrease over three stitches as referenced below. Image 4: depicts where the first 3 SC corner is made as referenced below.

I like to start at the top, left side.  Insert hook into the first stitch of both panels, draw up a loop and CH 1.  SC in the same stitch and in each remaining stitch until you reach the space between the two legs.  At this point, I recommend a SC decrease worked over 3 stitches.  In other words, insert hook into the last stitch of the bottom leg, yarn over and pull through (2 loops on hook), insert hook into the skipped stitch between legs, yarn over and pull through (3 loops on hook), insert hook into the first stitch of next bottom leg, yarn over and pull through (4 loops on hook), yarn over and pull through all loops on hook. 

Continue working one SC in each stitch until you reach the top bump.  I recommend making 3 SC in the top right “corner”, I do this in the right most stitch of Row 38.  At this point, I recommend placing safety eyes and securing the backs, if using.  This is also a good time to stuff the piece. Then, continue making one SC until you get to the top left “corner”.  Again, I recommend making 3 SC in this corner or in the left most stitch of Row 38.  SS to join to starting SC, fasten off, and weave in yarn tails.

Flower #1:                                   

Round 1:  Magic ring *SC, CH 3 and SS into side of the SC (creating a picot)*.  Repeat from * 5 times total.  SS to join and break yarn leaving a long tail for sewing. 

Make several and set aside. (I used two.)

Flower #2:                                   

  • Round 1:  CH 3 and SS to join, forming a ring.
  • Round 2:  CH 1.  *SC into the ring formed in Round 1 and CH 2*.  Repeat from * 6 times total.  SS to join and break yarn leaving a long tail for sewing. 

Make several and set aside. (I used three.)

Decide how you like your flowers and stitch them down on along the top edge.

Create The Dress:                       

  • Cut several strips of tulle – this doesn’t have to be exact, though each piece should be approximately the same size.  The roll of tulle I used was 3 inches wide.  If you have a slightly larger roll, you could fold your pieces in half vertically or cut them down to approximately 3 inches wide.  I cut my strips approximately 13 inches long.  I cut 20 strips, but I only ended up using 11 strips, so you don’t need much!
  • Once you have your strips, you will use your 3.75 mm crochet hook to attach them.  See images below.  Pick a row of stitches and use that as a guide for your tulle placement.  I ended up attaching a strand of tulle approximately every other stitch, but again this doesn’t have to be exact!  Just keep it relatively even. 

Putting it all Together:            

  • Using embroidery floss and a sharp needle, embroider a mouth. 
  • I also embroidered some little pink cheeks on mine by stitching a small line just under the eyes.
  • If attaching a pocket to the back, cut a rectangle from a piece of felt – my rectangle is approximately 3.75 inches long by 2.25 inches tall.  Note:  You may choose to crochet a pocket if you prefer.
  • If embroidering a name or initials, do so now using embroidery floss and a sharp needle. Secure the thread with a knot and trim.  You could consider using a very small, dab of glue to further adhere the ends.
  • Center the pocket onto the backside of the tooth.  Use a sharp needle and embroidery floss to attach the pocket along three edges only (i.e. the sides and bottom).  I like to back stitch for this as I am better able to keep my stitches relatively straight.
  • If attaching ribbon in order to hang, cut desired length – at least 12 inches – insert around a stitch near the top on the back panel and tie or stitch closed to make a loop.

As always, I love to see your finished work. You can tag me on Facebook or Instagram @shemakescrochet.

You are free to share your finished work, to include selling your finished products, but please credit me – SheMakesCrochet – as the pattern designer. Please do not distribute this pattern or any portion of it, instead direct people to my blog. THANK YOU!

4 thoughts on “Fairy Tooth Pillow

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s